What Went Wrong: The Pulitzer Prize-Winning Special Section of the Miami Herald, December 20, 1992 – a set on Flickr

On August 24, 1992, Hurricane Andrew made landfall at Miami as a Category 5 storm. The affects were devastating.

In December 20, 1992, the Miami Herald published a 16-page special report that examined weather records, building inspection reports, and damaged buildings.

Their reporting showed how “lax zoning, inspection and building codes had contributed to the destruction”. They won the Pulitzer Prize for Public Service for this reporting.

via What Went Wrong: The Pulitzer Prize-Winning Special Section of the Miami Herald, December 20, 1992 – a set on Flickr.

Nieman Reports | Reporting With the Tools of Social Science

Cynics would say “precision journalism” is an oxymoron, like unbiased opinion or civil war. But precision is an ideal to be sought in journalism, though not often achieved.

As defined by Knight Ridder reporter Philip Meyer in his groundbreaking 1973 book of the same name, precision journalism is the use of the tools of social science to replace, or at least supplement, reporters’ time-honored methods of citing anecdotal evidence and doing educated guesswork. Today, thanks to Meyer’s call, I’m one of hundreds of investigative reporters who have crafted serious stories using such tools as survey research, statistical analysis, experimentation and hypothesis testing. It’s social science done on deadline.

via Nieman Reports | Reporting With the Tools of Social Science.