Mediatwits #100: Data Visualizations at LA Times; Defining a Journalist or Acts of Journalism? | Mediashift | PBS

As digital platforms become more complex, journalists no longer simply ask themselves how best to portray a story with words and pictures. The digital medium provides unique and dynamic opportunities for stories and data to come to life. Data visualization — graphs, animations, interactives, and more — is increasingly becoming one more tool in a journalist’s storytelling kit. This week, we’ll be joined by Len de Groot, the new director of data visualization at the Los Angeles Times, to discuss how media outlets are pushing the limits of visual storytelling. We’ll also take a more philosophical turn on this episode and discuss the tricky issue of defining a journalist, especially in the context of penning shield laws that protect journalists from identifying their sources. To make sense of that debate, we’ll be joined by MediaShift contributors Jonathan Peters and Josh Stearns. We’ll also be joined by our regular panelist Andrew Lih of American University, new media consultant Sarah Evans, and our host Mark Glaser of MediaShift.

via Mediatwits #100: Data Visualizations at LA Times; Defining a Journalist or Acts of Journalism? | Mediashift | PBS.

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Why Defining a Journalist Is Messy, But Crucial | Mediashift | PBS

Although it might seem like an exercise in navel gazing, the task of defining a journalist is important and practical, and now is a good time to take it on. But before we go into more detail, a few words to widen the lens.

The spring and summer of 2013 did not signal the high-water mark of press freedom in the United States. In May, the Department of Justice (DOJ) confirmed that it had obtained months of phone records of Associated Press reporters and a “portfolio of information” about a Fox News correspondent — all to investigate the sources of certain leaks and possibly to intimidate leakers. Criticism of the DOJ was swift and harsh, and it came from all directions, with Lucy Dalglish, dean of the journalism school at the University of Maryland, putting it best: “The message is loud and clear that if you work for the federal government and talk to a reporter that we will find you.”

via Why Defining a Journalist Is Messy, But Crucial | Mediashift | PBS.

Let’s Stop Defining Who Is a Journalist, and Protect All Acts of Journalism | Mediashift | PBS

Two reports released last week tackle this question from very different perspectives. Jonathan Peters and Edson Tandoc wrote a post on PBS MediaShift headlined “Defining a Journalist Is Messy, But Crucial.” Their research focused on using “scholarly, legal, and industry” texts to determine common elements of how a journalist is generally defined.

What emerged is a definition that even the authors themselves won’t stand behind, calling it a “fatal blow to new forms of journalism.”

via Let’s Stop Defining Who Is a Journalist, and Protect All Acts of Journalism | Mediashift | PBS.

[Lecture Notes] “What is Journalism and the Elements of Journalism”

Links to some of the pointers related to the Topic of “What is Journalism and the Elements of Journalism” for the introductory lecture in the CJ Class of 2014.

Who Uses Facebook for News | Pew Research Center’s Journalism Project

Who Uses Facebook for News | Pew Research Center’s Journalism Project.

On Facebook, the largest social media platform, news is a common but incidental experience, according to an initiative of Pew Research Center in collaboration with the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation.

Overall, about half of adult Facebook users, 47%, “ever” get news there. That amounts to 30% of the population.

Most U.S. adults do not go to Facebook seeking news out, the nationally representative online survey of 5,173 adults finds. Instead, the vast majority of Facebook news consumers, 78%, get news when they are on Facebook for other reasons. And just 4% say it is the most important way they get news. As one respondent summed it up, “I believe Facebook is a good way to find out news without actually looking for it.”

Global manhunt will leverage social media to find suspects | Geek Gestalt – CNET News

Global manhunt will leverage social media to find suspects | Geek Gestalt – CNET News.

If you had to track down fugitives hidden in five cities around the world, would one day and a $5,000 reward be enough to succeed? And if so, how?

That’s what the people behind the TAG Challenge want to know–and what the whole world will soon find out.

On March 31, mug shots of five “suspects” will be published, and it’ll be game on in a global hunt for “jewel thieves” in Bratislava, Slovakia; Stockholm; London; Washington, D.C.; and New York City, each of whom will spend 12 hours that day in public areas. The first team to upload photographs of each of the five by noon eastern time on April 1 will win the competition–and with it, a ton of international glory.

Then again, there’s a good chance no one will win, given the limited time available to contestants.

The competition is based in part on 2009’s DARPA Red Balloon Challenge–in which DARPA hid 10 balloons around the United States and offered a $40,000 prize to the first team that could find them all in a single day.

Should journalists learn programming skills?: A Flowchart – 10,000 Words

With the current revolution in technology and journalism, many journalism pundits are blindly advocating non-technical journalists learn programming and web development skills. Programming, as opposed to coding HTML or CSS, takes a considerable time commitment to learn and may or may not come natural to the average journalist.

via Should journalists learn programming skills?: A Flowchart – 10,000 Words.