2012

INFORMATION

Catalog Description

This class is aimed at understanding the computational and technological advancements in the area of journalism. Primary focus is on the study of technologies for developing new tools for (a) sense-making from diverse news information sources, (b) the impact of more and cheaper networked sensors (c) collaborative human models for information aggregation and sense-making, (d) mashups and the use of programming in journalism, (e) the impact of mobile computing and data gathering, (f) computational approaches to information quality, (g) data mining for personalization and aggregation, and (h) citizen journalism. Complete schedule and other information will be on the t-square site available to only students taking the class.

Instructor

  • Irfan Essa (irfan at cc dot gatech dot edu). Email is the best way to get a hold of the instructor, if class related make sure to add CJ2012 in the subject line. For more information go here. Office hours after class, and can be scheduled via email.

TA

  • Yachna Sharma (ysharma3 at gatech dot edu). Office hours can be scheduled via email OR will be announced as needed.

Books

  • [K&R] Bill Kovach and Tom Rosenstiel (2007). The Elements of Journalism: What Newspeople Should Know and the Public Should Expect. 2007. Three Rivers Press. (Amazon)
  • [PM] Philip Meyer (2002) Precision journalism: a reporter’s introduction to social science methods. 2001. Rowman & Littlefeild (Google Books)

Grading

Both the UG section (CS 4464) and the Grad section (CS 6465) will meet together and share every effort, except one. Grad students will be required to lead and critique a paper or a journalism project or site in class and with a report (10 min presentation).  Each group will be compared separately for final grade assignments.  (Some of the following, subject to slight modifications as the term unfolds).

CS 4464

  • Assignments 1, 2, 3 (33%, 11% each)
  • In class and written paper presentation or a critique of a journalism effort/site. (8%)
  • Class and Online Participation (15%)
  • Review of Assigned Readings before EACH Class (12%)
  • Final Project 32%
    • Includes, Proposal (3%), 2 Updates (4% each, 8%), Presentation/Demonstration(10%), Report (8%) and Self-Evaluation (3%)

CS 6465

  • Assignments 1, 2, 3 (33%, 11% each)
  • In class and written paper presentation or a critique of a journalism effort/site. (8%)
  • Class and Online Participation (11 15%)
  • Presentation in Class of one of the papers (4%)
  • Review of Assigned Readings before EACH Class (12%)
  • Final Project (32%)
    • Includes, Proposal (3%), 2 Updates (4% each, 8%), Presentation/Demonstration(10%), Report (8%) and Self-Evaluation (3%)

Topics to be COVERED in this class include:

  • Overview of Journalism and Computational Disciplines
  • Elements of Journalism
  • Journalism is a (Social) Science
    • Precision Journalism
    • Investigative Reporting
  • News Gathering and Mobile Technology
    • Mobile Computing for news
    • People as Sensors: Citizen Journalism, Implications
    • Citizen Journalism
  • The Theory of Reporting and how computation participate
    • Storytelling with a Purpose
    • Contextualization & Sense-making
    • Information Quality, Bias in Reporting, Journalistic Values
  • The Practice of Reporting and the impact of Computing
    • Different Types/Styles of Reporting
    • The Blogsphere and Reporting
    • Citizen Journalism
    • Web 2.0, Semantic Web and WEB Science
    • Social Networking and Dynamics and NEWs / DATA collection.
    • Automated Reporting and Programming in Journalism
    • Generation of Newscasts and Documentaries
    • Mashups: Webservices, Online Data Sources
    • Investigative Programming
  • Computational Analysis of News Archives
    • Web Crawling / Scraping
    • Sentiment Analysis
    • Topic Detection and Tracking (Entity Extraction)
    • Video Analysis
    • Computational Linguistics and Natural Language Processing (NLP)
  • Visual Design, Illustration, and Visualization of News
    • Visual Communication and Information Design
    • Visualizing News Information
  • News Aggregation / Summarization / Personalization
    • Value Added Information Science
    • Models: Open Source (Wikification), Editor Based, Mixed
    • Automated Aggregation/Clustering vs. Person Powered Aggregation
  • Editing/Credibility/Authority/Reliability
    • Authoring, Authority, Credibility
    • The Role of the Editor, How is the web changing that.
  • Image and Video Manipulation
    • Tools / Techniques for Manipulation
    • Manipulation Detection and Digital Forensics
    • Ethics
  • News Consumption and Distribution
    • Interactivity: Not Just Consumption
    • Audience and Audience Measurement
    • Distribution Models, Media, Technologies
  • Advertising and the News
  • News Gaming
  • Legal Aspects
  • Ethics / Morality / Subjectivity
  • Media Monitoring
  • Information Accessibility
  • Sensemaking
  • Networked Journalism
  • Syndication
  • Information Science
  • Reputation / Recommender Systems

SCHEDULE/SYLLABUS

Here is a day by day schedule of the class. See T-Square @ GATech site for this class for details on readings and assignments. Some topics and readings are subject to change, so please make sure to check this site on weekly basis (at-least). Links are also provided to the T-square site to reading and other material as appropriate.


Classes: (January: 01020304050607), (February: 0809101112131415), (March: 16171819202122), (April: 2324252627282930)


Class 01:


Class 02:


Class 03:


Class 04:


Class 05:

  • Date: 1/24
  • Topic: Precision Journalism
  • Readings
    • Meyer [PM] Chapters 5-8

Class 06:

  • Date: 1/26
  • Topic: Data Analysis and Investigative Journalism
  • Readings
    • Meyer [PM] Chapters 9-12

Class 07:

  • Date: 1/31
  • Topic: TBA
  • Readings

Class 08:


Class 09:

  • Date: 2/7
  • Topic: Practice of Reporting
  • Readings
    • Scott Gant. “We’re All Journalists Now” Chapter 4, “The Transformation of Journalism and the Citizen Journalist’s Battle for Equality.” 2007. Link
    • Dana Hull. Blogging Between the Lines. American Journalism Review.Link
    • Carl Sessions Stepp. Center Stage. American Journalism Review.Link

Class 10:

  • Date: 2/9
  • Topic: Automated Reporting and Programming I
  • Readings
    • Bocconi, et al. (2005). Using Rhetorical Annotations for Generating Video Documentaries. In Proceedings of ICME, PDF
    • Poulsen (2006). MySpace Predator Caught by Code. Wired Oct 16, 2006. Link

Class 11:

  • Date: 2/14
  • Topic: Automated Reporting and Programming II
  • IN CLASS SESSION (Bring your laptops etc. if you can!).

Class 12:

  • Date: 2/16
  • Topic: Analysis of News
  • Readings (T-square Site)
    • Pang & Lee (2008) “Opinion Mining and Sentiment Analysis”, Foundations and Trends in Information Retrieval archive Volume 2 Issue 1-2, January 2008 [PDF] [DOI] (137 pages long).
    • Mullen and Malouf (2006). A preliminary investigation into sentiment analysis of informal political discourse. AAAI Symposium 2006 [PDF].
    • Etzioni, Cafarella, Downey, Popescu, Shaked, Soderland, Weld, Yates (2005), “Unsupervised named-entity extraction from the Web: An experimental study” Artificial Intelligence Volume 165, Issue 1, June 2005, Pages 91–134 [PDF] [DOI]
    • Wactlar HD, et al. (2000) “Complementary video and audio analysis for broadcast news archives.” CACM, 43(2) [PDF] [DOI]

Class 13:

  • Date: 2/21
  • Topic: Discussion of / about final projects
  • Readings

Class 14:

  • Date: 2/23
  • Topic: Visualization of News
  • Readings  (T-square Site)
    • Mehler, et al. (2006) Spatial Analysis of News Sources. IEEE TVCG 12(5). [PDF] [DOI]
    • Havre et al. (2002) ThemeRiver: Visualizing Thematic Changes in Large Document Collections. IEEE TVCG, 8(1). [PDF][DOI]

Class 15:

  • Date: 2/28
  • Topic: Aggregation to Sensemaking I
  • Readings
    • Cass Sunstein. Infotopia: How Many Minds Produce Knowledge. (Chapter 5) 2006.[PDF] [Google Book]

Class 16:

  • Date: 3/01
  • Topic: Aggregation to Sensemaking II
  • Readings
    • Radev  et al (2005) “NewsInEssence: summarizing online news topics”. CACM, 48(10) [PDF] [DOI]
    • Resnick et al. (1994)  ”GroupLens: An Open Architecture for Collaborative Filtering of News.” CSCW. [PDF][HTML][DOI]

Class 17:

  • Date: 3/6
  • Topic: Social Computing I
  • Readings
    • Andersen (2009), “Four crowdsourcing lessons from the Guardian’s (spectacular) expenses-scandal experiment” (link)
    • Hendler, Shadbolt, Hall, Berners-Lee, Weitzner (2008) “Web Science: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Understanding the Web” (link) (May need to go through GT Library)
    • danah boyd (2006), “Friends, Friendsters, and Top 8: Writing community into being on social network sites. In First Monday, Volume 11, Number 12 — 4 December 2006 (link)
    • boyd, d. m., & Ellison, N. B. (2007). Social network sites: Definition, history, and scholarship. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 13(1), article 11. (link)

Class 18:


Class 19:

  • Date: 3/13
  • Topic: In Class Session
  • Readings

Class 20:


Spring Break: 3/19 – 3/23


Class 21:


Class 22:


Class 23:

  • Date: 4/3
  • Final Project Update #1 DUE
  • Topic: In Class Critiques I (See T-Square Site)
  • Readings

Class 24:

  • Date: 4/5
  • Topic:  In Class Critiques II (See T-Square Site)
  • Readings

Class 25:


Class 26:

  • Date: 4/12
  • Topic: Online Ethics
  • Readings
    • Eckman and Lindlof (2003). “Negotiating the gray lines: An ethnographic case study of organisational conflict between advertorials and news”. Journalism Studies 4(1) 2003. pp 65-77. [PDF] [DOI]
    • Edmonds (2006). Online Ethics: the beginning of the end of an ad hoc era. Oct. 6, 2006.Link

Class 27:

  • Date: 4/17
  • Final Project Update #2 DUE
  • Topic: GUEST SPEAKER: Casey Fiesler, PhD Candidate in HCC at GA Tech on “Remix and Creativity, a Legal and New Media Perspetive”

Class 28:

  • Date: 4/19
  • Topic: GUEST SPEAKERS: TBA.
  • Readings

Class 29:

  • Date: 4/24
  • Final Project Presentation DUE (via T-square)
  • Topic: Final Project Presentations I
  • Readings

Class 30:

  • Date: 4/26
  • Topic: Final Project Presentations II
  • Readings

Final Exams: 4/30 – 5/4

Final Exam Period: 5/1/2012 (Tuesday 2:50pm – 5:40p). Everything DUE by 5:40p 5/1/2012.


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